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First Laguna Folk Dance Competition launched by LTCATO

Laguna Tourism, Culture, Arts & Trade Office
November 21, 2016
 
     The Provincial Government of Laguna through the Laguna Tourism, Culture, Arts and Trade Office (LTCATO), held the first Laguna Folk Dance Competition on November 4, 2016 at the Cultural Center of Laguna in Sta. Cruz, Laguna. 
     There were two categories; one for elementary students, with A La Jota as contest piece, and one for high school students, with Maglalatik as contest piece. The A La Jota was a dance from San Pablo City. It was derived from the Spanish Jota, a folk dance from the Region of Aragon. Jota is a Latin term meaning to jump to describe the lively, bouncy movements of the dance. 
     In the Philippines during the Spanish colonial era, the Jota was adapted with various versions created. It was usually performed during wedding occasions, although little of the original bouncy movements were incorporated in the A La Jota of San Pablo City. The Maglalatik, sometimes called Magbabao, is a rhythmical dance mimicking battles between Muslims and Christians. Using coconut shells as implements, the Maglalatik is a war dance depicting the conflict between Muslims and the Christians. Its surprising ending is the eventual reconciliation of the warring parties. The dance originated from Binan City, specifically from the barrios of Loma and Zapote. It was performed during the celebration of the Fiesta of Binan wherein dancers will go from house to house for money or gift during the day, and join the procession during the night. Though popular as a war dance, it is also performed as homage to Binan’s patron saint, San Isidro Labrador. 
     Jean Ariane R. Flores, grand champion of the 7th Maria Kundiman Song Festival (high school category) and Mr. Leodel Audie Moralde, Jr., grand champion of the 7th Maria Kundiman Song Festival (senior category) delighted the audience with Kundiman songs.
     There were 15 participating elementary schools and 17 high schools. Winners for elementary category were Pila Elementary School (3rd), Ananias Laico Memorial Elementary School (2nd), and Sta. Cruz Central Elementary School (1st). Winners for the high school category were San Pablo City National High School (3rd), Balian National High School (2nd), and Lumot National High School (1st).