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Majayjay Medicare Hosp­ital

Programs & Projects

 
  • Infection Control is the discipline concerned with preventing hospital-acquired or healthcare-associated infection, a practical (rather than academic) sub-discipline of epidimiology. It is an essential, though often under-recognized and under-supported, part of the infrastructure of health care. Infection control and hospital epidemiology are akin to public health practice, practiced within the confines of a particular health-care delivery system rather than directed at society as a whole.

                                                

 

 

  • Newborn Screening is a simple procedure to find out if your baby has a congenital metabolic disorder that may lead to mental retardation and even death if left untreated.

    The goal of newborn screening is to give all newborns a chance to live a normal life. It provides the opportunity for early treatment of diseases that are diagnosed before symptoms appear. Included in the panel of disorders under the Philippine Newborn Screening Program are: Congenital Hypothyroidism (CH), Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH), Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) Deficiency, Galactosemia (Gal) and Phenylketonuria (PKU).

                                                  

 

 

  • Diabetic clinic

        Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease caused by the inability of the pancreas to produce insulin or to use the insulin                     produced in the proper way.

Prevention of Diabetes
There is no foolproof way to prevent diabetes, but steps can be taken to improve the chances of avoiding it:
·         Exercise. Studies of both men and women have shown that vigorous exercise, even if done only once a week, has a protective effect against diabetes. Exercise not only promotes weight loss but lowers blood sugar as well.
·         Lose weight. There is evidence that both men and women who gain weight in adulthood increase their risk of diabetes. A study conducted at Harvard showed that adult women who gained 11 to 17 pounds since the age of 18 doubled their risk of diabetes; those who gained between 18 and 24 pounds almost tripled their risk. Fact: 90 percent of diabetics are overweight.
·         Diet. The use of a diet low in calories and in saturated fat is an ideal strategy for preventing Type II diabetes. 
·         Stop smoking. Smoking is especially dangerous for people with diabetes who are at risk for heart and blood vessel diseases.
·         Use alcohol in moderation. Moderation for men means no more than two drinks a day; for women, one drink is the limit. Choose drinks that are low in alcohol and sugar such as dry wines and light beers.
 

                                                                     

 

                                                 

 

 

 

  • Stress Management is becoming an important part of our modern day lifestyle. It's so important that you should have a number of stress management activities that you perform on a regular basis to keep the stress and strain of everyday life in check.

 

Below is a list of quick and easy stress management activities that you can fit into your hectic daily routine.
  ·   Get regular exercise. We tend to neglect ourselves when we're stressed, so increasing our exercise can be a good way of reducing stress. You don't have to go to the gym to get exercise. Parking your car further away in the parking lot will work. So will taking the stairs rather than the lift or elevator.
·         Take a break. It doesn't have to be a long break - even a walk to the water cooler and back can do the trick. This gives your mind a break and often means that you come back to whatever it was that you were working on with a new level of enthusiasm.
·         Eat well. When we're stressed, our diet can often suffer as well. Choose healthy, nutritious food. And make sure that you are actually "conscious" when you are eating. Too often we eat on auto pilot, stuffing food into our mouth without thinking about it. Eat consciously. Don't eat whilst walking, driving, reading or watching television. Treat eating as it's own important activity.
·         Sleep well. Don't drink coffee or other caffeinated drinks close to bed time.
·         If you drink, cut down on your alcohol consumption. Alcohol is a depressant drug. Drinking alcohol before you sleep will reduce the quality of your sleep.

 

                                                

 

 

  •  Patien Education is the process by which health professionals and others impart information to patients that will alter their health behaviors or improve their health status.

    Important elements of patient education are skill building and responsibility: patients need to know when, how, and why they need to make a lifestyle change. Group effort is equally important: each member of the patient’s health care team needs to be involved.
    The value of patient education can be summarised as follows:
    § Improved understanding of medical condition, diagnosis, disease, or disability.
    § Improved understanding of methods and means to manage multiple aspects of medical condition.
    § Improved self advocacy in deciding to act both independently from medical providers and in interdependence with them.
    § Increased Compliance – Effective communication and patient education increases patient motivation to comply.
    § Patient Outcomes – Patients more likely to respond well to their treatment plan – fewer complications.
    § Informed Consent – Patients feel you’ve provided the information they need.
    § Utilization – More effective use of medical services – fewer unnecessary phone calls and visits.
    § Satisfaction and referrals – Patients more likely to stay with your practice and refer other patients.
    § Risk Management - Lower risk of malpractice when patients have realistic expectations.
     
     

                                               

 

 

  • Child's Health 

                                              

        Vitamin A Supplementation-from 1993 to 1997, the Department of Health centrally managed the vitamin A supplementation program. The local government units, specifically through the Provincial Health Office and Rural Health Units, assisted in the implementation of the program at the local level. By 1998, the management of the vitamin A supplementation program was devolved to local government units, although the national Department of Health continues to provide the vitamin A capsules to ensure the sustainability of the program.  

 

 

 

                                               

Hepatitis B Vaccination-An early start of Hepatitis B vaccine reduces the chance of being infected and becoming a carrier. Prevents liver cirrhosis and liver cancer which are more likely to develop if infected with Hepatitis B early in life. About 9,000 die of complications of Hepatits B. 10% of Filipinos have Hepatitis B infection.